Saturday, 16 November 2013

Painful times

The FH has really been suffering with his gout in the wrist today and last night.  I hope we have a better night's sleep tonight.

We have a dilemma, and it isn't a particularly easy one, as all the professionals that he sees seem to have slightly different opinions!  We both think that it is better to cope with bursts of intense pain as he is experiencing now, whilst his overall health is kept on an even keel, rather than to add yet more long term medication to his arsenal of pills, and in doing so risk his long term health, as happened at the start of the year.

We are off to Papworth again at the end of the month, so I can see more discussions on the agenda there.  Until then, we have codeine, paracetamol, hot water bottles, slings, cold compresses, the works!

Off to bed now...

8 comments:

Sarah Head said...

Morgan, Have you thought about herbal alternatives for your husband's gout? One of the best remedies for the extreme pain of gout is potato juice - tastes revolting but does the trick. The other anti-inflammatoryies such as yarrow, burdock and celery seed won't interact with his other medications. I can refer you to some qualified herbalists in Lincoln if this would be helpful for you.

Morgan said...

Sarah - good to know you are still reading my ramblings! I have a local homeopath that I have used myself here which I have been considering, but hadn't thought of herbalists. I shall investigate what you recommend in the morning, and I certainly would be interested in talking with a herbalist. We can't risk doing anything which would interfere with his medication. Thank you for taking the time to contribute - it is appreciated xx

Cro Magnon said...

Rather what what to take for gout, more important is what NOT to take. I'm sure you know that it is Uric acid crystals that cause the pain in gout, and as such it's important to avoid foods that are rich in 'Purines'. Unfortunately this includes almost everything we really enjoy. Most meats, fish, whole grain breads, and BEER. Sounds like a very tedious diet. Hope he improves.

Angela said...

The complications of multiple ailments are a real problem- praying that FH gets some relief from the gout soon, without side-effects. Praying that the experts at Papworth can offer help too
xxx

Lyssa Medana said...

Sending hugs and prayers. WS xxx

Morgan said...

Thank you all for your comments and thoughts for the FH.

He has had some leek and potato soup for lunch, as he didn't fancy pure potato juice, so hopefully that is at least a move in the right direction.

Beer has been off his menu for years as has all alcohol because of his health and medications.

It is likely that the gout is caused in his case by the weakness of his kidneys and some of the particular medications that he is taking; although I don't believe that we will rectify it all through changing his diet, we are doing what we can to keep meat intake to a minimum without him actually becoming vegetarian. Quality of life is so important in the equation, and we are talking about a man of 76 who would have died about 15 years ago but for the heart transplant he had - the drugs he takes for that are some of the ones causing the problems, so we have to keep everything in balance. As he has said, he wants to stay alive as long as he can, but he doesn't want to stay alive in pain and miserable with no enjoyment in his life......

terriersintiaras said...

I have gout myself and sympathise fully with your FH I had for five years relied on natural remedies, but despite using them and despite, losing over four stone in weight my attacks were increasing in length and severity. In the end I agreed to try a new preventative ( I am allergic to allopurinol which is the usual treatment) and I have not had an attack for over a year, which for me is a new record. I am fortunate in that my doctor is young, and week informed about the condition and the new range of treatments available. I would suggest that you recon tact your own doctor and ask to be referred to a rheumatologist.
There is, despite popular belief to the contrary, only a 17% chance that gout is triggered by diet! it is in fact a 93% chance that it hereditary. Please feel free to e-mail me if you want to chat further about gout, I know how excruciatingly painful it can be.

Morgan said...

Many thanks, Terriersintiaras, for your contribution - I am sorry to hear that you have been suffering as well. If the new treatment that you refer to is fuboxestat, the FH has had it and it was more than likely the cause of his hospitalisations earlier this year. We have a rheumatologist, who has also offered steroid injections. If you want to leave your email address in a comment which I won't publish, I will get in touch. Thank you x